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MLC books

Welcome to the Munster
Literature Centre

Founded in 1993, the Munster Literature Centre (Ionad Litríochta an Deiscirt) is a non-profit arts organisation dedicated to the promotion and celebration of literature, especially that of Munster. To this end, we organise festivals, workshops, readings and competitions. Our publishing section, Southword Editions, publishes a biannual journal, poetry collections and short stories. We actively seek to support new and emerging writers and are assisted in our efforts through funding from Cork City Council, Cork County Council and the Arts Council of Ireland.Originally located in Sullivan's Quay, the centre moved to its current premises in the Frank O'Connor House (the author's birthplace) at 84 Douglas Street, in 2003.

In 2000, the Munster Literature Centre organised the first Frank O'Connor International Short Story Festival, an event dedicated to the celebration of the short story and named for one of Cork's most beloved authors. The festival showcases readings, literary forums and workshops. Following continued growth and additional funding, the Cork City - Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award was introduced in 2005, coinciding with Cork's designation as that year's European Capital of Culture. The award is now recognised as the single biggest prize for a short story collection in the world and is presented at the end of the festival.In 2002, the Munster Literature Centre introduced the Seán Ó Faoláin Short Story Prize, an annual short story competition dedicated to one of Ireland's most accomplished story writers and theorists. This too is presented during the FOC festival. The centre also hosts the Cork Spring Literary Festival each year, at which the Gregory O'Donoghue International Poetry Prize is awarded (established 2010).

Workshops are held by featured authors in both autumn and spring, allowing the general public to receive creative guidance in an intimate setting for a minimal fee. In addition, the centre sponsors a Writer in Residence each year. We invite you to browse our website for further information regarding our events, Munster literature, and other literary information. Should you have any queries, we would be happy to hear from you.

 

 

 

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Literature Centre
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Munster Literature Centre

 

 

 

 

THE GREGORY O'DONOGHUE

INTERNATIONAL POETRY PRIZE

 

Gregory O'Donoghue

 

2016 winners (Judge: Patrick Cotter)

2015 winners (Judge: Matthew Sweeney)

2014 winners (Judge: Patrick Cotter)

2013 winners (Judge: Thomas McCarthy)

2012 winners (Judge: Patrick Cotter)

2011 winners (Judge: Leanne O'Sullivan)

2010 winners (Judge: James Harpur)

*

How to enter our competition.

 

 

 

 

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2016 Winners

These poems will be published in the April 2016 issue of Southword Journal
More information will be given at a later stage about the winners. but here quickly are the results of this year's competition. We realise many of you will want to submit elsewhere for December 31st deadlines and speedy delivery of this news will be beneficial.. There were almost 2000 poems entered so competition was stiff. But standards were so high I decided to increase the number of published "Highly Commended" poems from ten to twenty-five. I will publish a detailed judge's summation on my blog in the new year. In the meantime I would like to thank everyone who entered. We are a registered charity and your entry has helped us to keep Southword free for readers and provide publication fees for authors.
Patrick Cotter

First Prize
‘After Another Attempt at Eighteen’
by Leila Chatti, West Bloomfield, Michigan, USA

Second Prize,
‘The Invisible Man’s Blind Date’
by Michael Derrick Hudson, Fort Wayne, Indiana, USA


Third Prize

‘Different Kinds of Life’
by James O’Sullivan, Cork, Ireland

Highly commended – in alphabetical order:
‘Sindhura, Andalusia’ by Amanda Bell, Dublin 6, Ireland
‘Of Love, Sappho Wrote’ by Leila Chatti, West Bloomfield, Michigan, USA
‘Gull Egg Season’ by Stephanie Conn, Ballyclare, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland
‘Flood’ by Marie Coveney, Monkstown, Co Cork, Ireland
‘A Stay in North Carolina’ by Kelly Creighton, Newtownards, Co Down, Northern Ireland
‘Our Recurring List of Heartbreaks’ by Jonathan Greenhause, Jersey City, New Jersey, USA
‘Perfect’ by Michael Fleming, Brattleboro, Vermont, USA
‘The End of St. Barbara’ by Eithne Hand, Ireland
‘A Calling’ by Eleanor Hooker, Nenagh, Co Tipperary, Ireland
‘Loch na Fuaiche’ by Theophilus Kwek, UK
‘Aristotle’s Lantern by Anthony Lawrence, Kingscliff, New South Wales, Australia
‘Mary Daly’ by Simon Lewis, Crossneen, Carlow, Ireland
‘Solace at the P.O.’by Sandy Longley, Delmar, New York, USA
‘From a Hauptbahnhof Café in Berlin by Terry McDonagh, Swinford, Co. Mayo, Ireland
‘The Cure for the Burn’ by Paul McMahon, Kinsale, Co Cork, Ireland
‘How to Construct the Hero of a Western’ by Jennifer Militello, Goffstown, New Hampshire, USA
‘As Much As A Letter’ by Emily Mohn-Slate, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
‘Looking West from Iona’ by Valerie Nieman, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA
‘Photograph, Painting, Poem’ by Mary O’Donnell, Maynooth, Co Kildare, Ireland
’10.30 to Severn Beach’ by Elizabeth Parker, Bristol, Avon, UK
‘A Little off the Top’ by Laura Jan Shore, New Brighton, New South Wales, Australia
‘Oranmore’ by Peter Stuart-Sheppard, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
‘Call Her Ghazal’ by Devon Walker-Domine, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
‘Taking Soup’ by Glen Wilson, Portadown, Co Armagh, Northern Ireland
‘Bloodsuckers’ by Mary Woodward, St Albans, UK

 

2015 Winners

These poems will be published in a future issue of Southword Journal.

 

1st Prize: 'Self Portrait in the Convex Bulge of a Hare's Eye'

Breda Wall Ryan

by Breda Wall-Ryan of Co. Wicklow, Ireland

 

2nd Prize: 'Love Meter'

Caitlin Pryor

by Caitlin Pryor of Texas, USA

 

3rd Prize: 'Radio Clash'

Jane Satterfield

by Jane Satterfield of Maryland, USA

 

 

Shortlisted poems 2015

alphabetically by poet

These poems will be published in a future issue of Southword Journal.

 

Devreaux Baker, California USA
'Conquistador Fragments'

Michael Fleming, Vermont USA
'The Merry Dancers'

Rachel Galvin, Illinois USA
'Arab Spring'

Simon Jackson, Derbyshire UK
'A Whoop of Gorillas'

Stefani M. Lipsey, New York USA
'Ghazal for Streets Named Mawar'

Jim Maguire, Wexford Ireland
'After the Guests Have Gone'

Michael Lee Phillips, California USA
'Fireflies'

Karen Skolfield, Massachusetts USA
'Quake Kills Hundreds, Creates Island Off Coast'

Theresa D. Smith, California USA
'You Died Among Oranges'

Anthony Watts, Somerset UK
'A Proper Fire'

 

 

Highly commended poems 2015

alphabetically by poet

 

Eric Berlin
' Amen'

Wes Civilz, Tucson, USA
'Bags of Words'

Marie Coveney, Co Cork, Ireland
'The Bay'

Usha Kishore, Isle of Man
'The Jabberwock Replies'

Alison Luterman, California, USA
' Paying the Rent'

Rob Miles, Leeds UK
' Small Devices'

Geraldine Mitchell, Co Mayo, Ireland
'Miel Bruyére'

Marie Naughton, Manchester UK
My First Husband

Susan Azar Porterfield, USA
' The Sound Of'

Ruth Smith, Kent, UK
' Colour Plate from The Practical Home Doctor'

Gráinne Tobin, Co Down, Northern Ireland
'Zorbing in the Basement Brasserie'

Chloe Wilson, Victoria, Australia
'Miss Havisham, Bachelorette'

 

 

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2014 Winners

 

1st Prize: 'Hummingbird'

 

maya

by Maya Catherine Popa of New York, USA

 

 

2nd Prize: 'The Weather in the Mournes'

 

paula cunningham

by Paula Cunningham of Belfast, Northern Ireland

 

 

3rd Prize: 'Benito'

 

matthew sweeney

by Matthew Sweeney of Cork, Ireland

 

 

Shortlisted poems 2014

alphabetically by poet

These poems will be published in the next issue of Southword Journal.

 

Dean Browne, Cork, Ireland for ‘Cithóg’
Faizal Deen, Ontario, Canada for ‘Museum’
Mark Fiddes, London, UK for ‘Another Gravity’
James Hughes, Melbourne, Australia for ‘The Breath in Things’
Ian McEwen, Bedford, UK for ‘In the Bottle’
Nuala Ní Chonchúir, Galway, Ireland for ‘Juno Refuses to Look at Warhol’
Meghann Plunkett, New York, USA for ‘Eve’
Maya Catherine Popa, New York, USA for ‘The Bees Have Been Cancelled’
Theadora Siranian, Massachusetts,USA for ‘Hitler’s Bathtub’
Mark Wagenaar, Texas, USA for ‘Broken Sonnet: Last Sketch’

 

Highly commended poems 2014

alphabetically by poet

J T Barbarese, USA
Judith Barrington, USA
Maria Isakova Bennett, UK
Brian M. Biggs, USA
Danielle Blau, USA
Charlotte Buckley, UK
Elaine Cosgrove, Ireland
Vanessa Couto Johnson, USA
Michael Farry, Ireland
Liz Gallagher, Spain
Victoria Kennefick, Ireland
Peter Kent, UK
Usha Kishore, Isle of Man
Dave Lordan, Ireland
David McLoghlin, Ireland

Winifred McNulty, Ireland
Michael G. Rather, USA
Frank Russo, Australia
Rachael Pettus, Cyprus
Martin Sharry, Ireland
Lorna Shaughnessy, Ireland

 

 

Commended poems 2014

alphabetically by poet

Opal Palmer Adisa, Virgin Islands
LJ Allen, USA
Betsy Aoki, USA
Eric Berlin (no address)
C. Wade Bentley USA
David Butler, Ireland
Angela T. Carr, Ireland
Alvey Carragher, Ireland
A. Chakrabarti, France
Sarah Clancey, Ireland
Geraldine Clarkson UK
Tim Collins, Australia
Craig Cotter, USA
Maurice Devitt, Ireland
Michael Dooley, Ireland
James Faucette, USA
John Fitzgerald, Ireland
Kevin Foley, Ireland
Caroline Glen, Australia
Frank Golden, Ireland
Thomas Heffernan, USA
Niamh Hehir, Ireland
Michael Herron, Ireland
Tania Hershman, UK
Nancy Hoffman, USA
Eleanor Hooker, Ireland
Caoilinn Hughes, New Zealand
Janet Joyner, USA
Alisha Kaplan, USA
Susan Kelly, Ireland
Noel King, Ireland
Simon Lewis, Ireland
Michael McCarthy UK
Aifric McGlinchey, Ireland
B. McClatchey, USA
Michael McKimm, UK
Jim Maguire, Ireland
Eamon Mag Uidhir, Ireland
Madeleine Mac Namara, Ireland
Orla Martin, Ireland
Kim Moore, UK
Tom Moore, Ireland
Paddy Moran, Ireland
Judith Neale, USA
Jean O’Brien, Ireland
Mary O’Brien, Ireland
Karen O’Connor, Ireland
Hugh O’Donnell, Ireland
Gréagóir Ó Dúil, Ireland
Paul Perry, Ireland
Edward Power, Ireland
Michael Ray, Ireland
Marco Roberto Rinaldi, Italy
Helen Klein Ross, USA
Breda Wall Ryan, Ireland
John W. Sexton, Ireland
Colm Scully, Ireland
Michael Sheehan, Ireland
Laura Shore, Australia
Alison Thompson, Australia
Charles P R Tisdale, USA
Jose Varghese, India
Robert Watson, USA
John Whitworth, UK
Ian Wild, Ireland
Sherraine Pate Williams, USA
Kathleen Willard, USA
Landa Wo, Germany
Charles Wuest, USA

 

 

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2013 Winners

 

1st Prize: 'The Conversation'

Judith Barrington

by Judith Barrington of Oregon, USA

 

 

2nd Prize: 'in the space between'

Gerry Boland

by Gerry Boland of Roscommon, Ireland

 

3rd Prize: 'Sashimi'

Maya Catherine Popa

by Maya Catherine Popa of New York, USA

 

Click here to view judge Thomas McCarthy's statement on the winning poems.

The best poems always demand our attention. They make demands upon us with an almost aggressive mildness. This is much more than a matter of style, more than a mere turn of phrase. A really good poem creates a clearing in the language, using both personal sensibility and technical adroitness. The fact is, when we read such a poem we see that is something we never thought of – it has created within us the illusion of a unique back-story. Yet it might be a poem about the most common thing in the world. For that one moment of the poem the most common thing will seem to be strange, fresh and unforeseen territory. This is how we recognise that we are in the presence of a new poet. The really good poem offers itself as an unexpected gift, sometimes a small gift but always sensational.


When I received the first batch of the over eighteen hundred poems submitted to the Munster Literature Centre I knew that I was in for weeks of good hunting and fishing. I was determined to watch for everything that rose from the crisp thicket of words. Which fine-plumaged poem had been resting in its own clearing, awaiting the hunter? I was hoping to be amazed. And I wasn’t disappointed. The Gregory O’Donoghue Prize is such an important literary ribbon – it is named in memory of one of the finest poets I ever met; a poet for whom the making of poetry was a lifelong task and an honourable vocation. As far as Gregory O’Donoghue was concerned it was the only lifelong task worth pursuing. I was hoping to find poems that would be fit companions for such a named prize.


A winter migration of nearly two thousand poems, arriving by email and regular post, gives one the opportunity to see the world working and meditating. More than half of all the poems submitted were of  a high enough quality to be published. No editor would be ashamed to stand over them and be their public advocate.  There were poems about wildlife, the sea, travel, deserts and mountains, fathers (fathers feature more than mothers), parents in nursing homes or surviving cancer, recession, politics and sport.  But the recurring motif than runs through much of this poetry is that of attachment and subsequent separation. Attachment, to lovers, fathers and places, was an overwhelming theme; or, more specifically, an overwhelming anxiety. Nearly all of the winning and Highly Commended poems share this communal poetic enquiry into our one great contemporary existentialist crisis: the difficulty of attachment in a world that has lost the great Father.


My winning poem ‘The Conversation’ (123) carries this anxiety into its most extreme exposition. Here, the narrator is beyond life but yearning to complete unfinished business in a world abandoned. Human life is presented in all its ordinariness within the parentheses of Frost and Lorca, cleverly invited as Father-witnesses. This is a poem that has made a wide clearing for itself, slow-burning and attaching itself more compellingly to us at each rereading. Here, the dead, the ones ‘lost for language’, may never return to familiar and familial attachments. Upon rereading, one sees that it is the world and its capacity for attachment and disappointment that ‘has kept the words that belong in that talk/ stuffed inside my mouth which is firmly closed/ like my eyes.’  The entire poem with its four robust stanzas and one orphaned line coheres as a single thought. This is a brilliant technical achievement; it reminds us all that great poetry is both fine thinking and achieved style. The narrator describes and teaches, telling us that death – and death in life – is ‘too late now for that conversation we never had’ – We can’t leave ‘The Conversation’ without becoming implicated in its anxieties. Technically, this is a mindful, thoughtful, calculated and superbly pre-meditated work. I have no hesitation – dare I say it, no anxiety? – in advocating it as my winning poem for the Gregory O’Donoghue Prize.


In second place, the runner-up, is ‘in the space between’ (1201), a superbly controlled and uncannily paced study of damaged, continuous attachment. The wonderful first line ‘the pillow wears the round indent of your absent head’ is bettered only by the closing, novelistic noir statement ‘you leave me as you always leave me.’ The repetition of ‘but better’ in the closing couplets is a master stroke and could only have been engineered by a highly sophisticated poetic talent. Here is a dramatic, traumatic, relationship, with the narrator cast in the role of Robert Graves’ ‘good angel’ and, therefore, constantly waiting for the return of the one true carrier of value. Here is a soul with one foot on the grass and one foot at the bedside, torn between the ‘inside’ of survival and the outside of ‘yearning.’ This is one of the best, and certainly one of the most heart-wrenching, love poems that I’ve read in the last few years.


In third place is ‘Sashimi’ (1275), a real peach of a short lyric, a masterpiece in painted miniatures. Cold as a fish, this narrator serves minimal portions of emotion ‘on iceless beds of clean bamboo.’ Here are seven observations compressed into a single poetic serving, but only after the superb knife-work of thought. Here is a dismembering of attachment, but with the hope of further bloody attachment as the bell signals the start of another auction. Ultimately, it is the narrator’s heart that shivers. This is a clean-cut, tightly organised, lyric; a poem that shows great skill and linguistic, as well as culinary, expertise. It is, quite simply, beautiful.

 

 

Highly commended poems 2013

alphabetically by poet

These poems will be published in the next issue of Southword Journal.

 

Judith Barrington--Oregon, USA: 'Martha, 1630'

Lisa Bickmore--Utah, USA: 'Hill Country'

Ron Carey--Dublin, Ireland: 'My Father Built England'

Mark Fiddes--London, UK: 'The Lost Gardens of West Norwood'

Helen Gaynor--Wexford, Ireland: 'Can't Get Out of Bed'

Seamus Harrington--Cork, Ireland: 'Open Day'

Usha Kishore--Isle of Man, UK: 'Marginal or Peripheral'

Jayne Stanton--Leicester, UK: Sin É

Laura Walker--Washington, USA: 'Gladiator Days'

Simon Williams--Devon, UK: 'House By a Burmese Lake'

 

Click here to view judge Thomas McCarthy's statement on highly commended poems.

Martha, 1630 (Judith Barrington)

This is a chilling account of misogyny in its early seventeenth century form. Here is a headpiece with a bit to hold a woman’s tongue, metaphor for so much of organised religion and our male dominated politics. Except that the metal bit in this poem, a ‘brank,’ is very real.  The narrator is the victim and this poem builds a relentless but understated scenario. The sense of regret here is more powerful than any exclamation of pain. The story is organised to make cruelty reasonable and this astonishing understatement is what makes this powerful poetry.

 

 Hill Country (Lisa Bickmore)
This is a superb love poem that begins faraway from the place of love-making. The pacing and movement, the controlled layering of descriptions, all drive the poem to an inevitable conclusion where land and history are enfolded by the loves’ final tasting of what birds in the sky already know. Lovers take their cue from nature, from birds that fly, swoop and dive, rather than from the acquisitive old politician, LBJ. The poet here shows great control and steady technique.

 

My Father Built England (Ron Carey)

This is a wonderful poem about our Irish migrations, about the navvies of Kilburn, piss, sweat, gaffers and fifty pounds pinned to the inside of an overcoat. It describes a life of sweat and wellies with a quietly assembled latter-day chauvinism. There is a clarity of description, certainty of naming and complete confidence in the paternal material. The closing couplet is understated and deadly.

 

 The Lost Gardens of West Norwood (Mark Fiddes)

This is a rare and excellent railway poem, reminiscent of the giant work by Philip Larkin,  echoed very cleverly in  the kissing couple, their embrace ‘blooming deep within us.’ But instead of the water meadows of Lincolnshire we have ‘the claylands of South London.’ The formal verse structure, the relentless movement towards Crystal Palace that contains love behind glass, creates a terrific sense of movement and control.

 

Can’t Get Out of Bed (Helen Gaynor)

A robust and formal poem, this is terrific fieldwork in depression. It is a philosophising therapy, an ability to lift the narrator reflexively through the reader; an effort to haul oneself through the power of words out of darkness. The poet, as always, wishes ‘for you not to be truly you’ – which is the pivotal poetic act that always has wishing at the heart of it. The poem works like the script of a late 1940s film, the moralising is the action. It is adamant, formal statement.

 

Open Day (Seamus Harrington)

Very few concrete poems are successful. Generally the theme has little to do with the form and the flight of the lines collapses. ‘Open Day’ is a notable exception in a sea of technical failures. It soars up the centre of the page ‘a helical spiral/of concentric cir-/ cles as each course/ of stonework narrows.’ It is a perfect description of our lemming-like communal walks in an unexpected weather-window. Descriptions are compressed and crowded so that they spill through the egg-timer of the centre. This is a beautifully made poem.

 

Marginal or Peripheral (Usha Kishore)

This poem is honest, painful and difficult narrative; an effort to come in from the race periphery to the racist core of the West. Here, the educated poet makes an effort to teach students who ‘mimic my accent in hyperboles.’ It is a call to action, to defeat grimaces, harsh words and jibes’ with a ‘subterranean coloured poetry/ in gender coded interlanguage.’ The poem reminds us, too, that racism is a geographical condition, like the weather of our North Atlantic; and that implicit racism even alters the meaning of words. It is a cry of despair at our unshared lexicon.

 

Sin É (Jayne Stanton)

The local also has its bragging rights and the poet in ‘Sin É’ has binged ‘on ambience, high on E minor.’ This brief lyric is a double description, of a poet’s late night progress through the wet Cork streets and of music’s slow progress through the poet’s sensitised imagination. Rising to his attic room on Wellington Road, the poet sees a ship on the Lee, a maritime movement that seems like liquid fingers playing a local music. This is a perfect, short lyric, that exists at a number of levels.

 

Gladiator Days (Laura Walker)

‘His name in my mouth is savory’ and ‘what is the penalty / for wanting a killer?’ might be the key phrases of this powerful poem. A thread of desire and the forces of attachment create a fretwork of humanity to hold all the bleak information contained within. It is a complex work, dense with information and ideas, a poetic contest between desire and death row. The poem cleverly moves from his phrases to his name, the whole work propelled by lines of great precision.

 

House By A Burmese Lake (Simon Williams)

Myth is the arrangement of the incidents and no myth comes as finally arranged as the images in a photograph. The intriguing final stanza of this poem is what lifts it away from mere narrative into a world of poetic speculation. It doesn’t take 15 years, nor does it take two open gates, to become open to the world as it changes. History changed, one feels, after this photograph, as did the destiny of ‘Burma.’ This is a very fine poem, a work that has great power not only through what is said but what is left undescribed.

 

 

 

 

Commended Poems 2013

listed alphabetically by poet

 

Judith Barrington, Oregon, USA: 'Yom Kippur'
Sylvie Baumgartel, New Mexico, USA: (title withheld)
Eric Berlin, New York, USA: 'What I Could'
Lisa Bickmore, Utah, USA: 'Thaumaturge'
Elizabeth Bodien, Pennsylvania, USA: 'How To Be An Enigma'
Gerry Boland, Co Roscommon, Ireland: 'red clock'
Dean Browne, Tipperary, Ireland: 'Fishing in the Flood'
Ron Carey, Dublin, Ireland: 'Carrownlaisheen'
Sarah Clancy, Galway, Ireland: 'Harvesting Underwater'
Lynn Deming, Connecticut, USA (2):
'Morning Route'
'Back-Lit'
Julian de Wette, Napier, South Africa: 'Pit Bull Territory'
Simon Peter Eggersten, New York, USA: 'Moving About Unnoticed'
Alyn Fenn, Co Cork, Ireland: 'Face Painting at the Fete'
Margaret Fulton-Cook, Renfrewshire, Scotland: 'Exodus: 2012'
Eleanor Hooker, Tipperary, Ireland: 'What Now?'
Tania Hershman, Bristol, UK: 'Me and Elvis on Dartmoor'
Deirdre Hines, Donegal, Ireland: 'La Chasse'
Stevie Howell, Toronto, Canada: 'Inspector’s Field Notes on the Death of Robert James Moore'
Victoria Kennefick, Co Cork, Ireland: 'Eating Wild Garlic'
John J. Kelly, Dublin, Ireland: 'Warrenpoint'
James Lavin, New Jersey, USA: 'Sunset at Doolin'
Ann Leahy, Dublin, Ireland: 'A Blackthorn Winter'
Wes Lee, Wellington, New Zealand (3):
‘black smoke’
'Leaving Work in Winter'
'Tin Sky'
Daniel Lenaghan, Seoul, Korea: 'I Would Explore You'
Donald Levering, New Mexico, USA (2):
'Shadows Cast by Four Birds'
'The Great Plains in Fog'
Finbarr MacEoin, Provence, France: 'Coming Out'
Patrick Maddock, Wexford, Ireland: 'Louise Latour'
Jane McKinley, New Jersey, USA (2):
'Positioning'
'Mudman'
Paul McMahon, Sligo, Ireland: 'Terremoto'
Jennifer Militello, New Hampshire, USA: 'A Dictionary of Venery in the Voice of Artemis'
Noel Monahan, Cavan, Ireland: 'Ghost of the Leaving Cert'
John Newton, Alberta, Canada: 'September of Forty-Four’
Don Nixon, Wolverhampton, UK: 'Olympic Bronze'
Patricia O'Callaghan, Dublin, Ireland: 'Special Care Unit'
Hugh O'Donnell, Dublin, Ireland (2):
'The Ballad of a Quiet Man'
'To My Sister in Faversham'
Finn O'Gorman, Armagh, Northern Ireland (3):
'Do Not Enter'
' Fir Beaga'
'Skippy’s Last Tour'
Josephine O'Grady, Cork, Ireland: 'Badrashi Boy'
Marie O'Halloran, Co Cork, Ireland (2):
'The Carer'
'The Heavy Boot'
M.R. Peacocke, Durham, UK: 'Re-entering the House'
Shannon Quinn, Toronto, Canada: 'Thaw'
Michael G. Rather, Jr., Texas, USA: 'The World After The Fall'
Nicholas Samaras, New York, USA: 'To an Infant Not Taken'
Deirdre Shanahan, Middlesex, UK: 'At the Marine Hotel'
Valerie Sirr, Dublin, Ireland: 'The Crease in John McCormack’s Shoes'
Joan Sullivan Gray, Massachusetts, USA: 'Purgatorio'
Charles P.R. Tisdale, North Carolina, USA: 'The Double Life'
Jean Tubridy, Waterford, Ireland: 'Nature'
Cliff Wedgbury, Cork, Ireland: 'Tea with Dad'
Lesley Wheeler, Virginia, USA: 'Belief'
Pat Winslow, Oxon, England: 'Beyond Frame'
Peter Wyton, Gloucester, UK: 'Dreaming the Dread'

 

 

_____________________

 

 

2012 Winners

 

 

First Prize: Sonogram Song by Suji Kwock Kim

 

Suji Kwock Kim, recipient of the 2012 Gregory O'Donoghue Poetry Prize

Click here to read competition judge Patrick Cotter's blog about his decision making process.

Second Prize: Ode to the Night and the Morning Following an All-Day of Arguing by Alinda Wasner

 

Third Prize: Meteorites by Tom Moore

 

 

 

Highly Commended

(alphabetical order)

 

Erica Miriam Fabri, New York, USA for “Fish

Judith Krause, Regina, Canada for “Mitterand’s Last Meal

Jude Neal, Bowen Island, Canada for “Blue Bowl

Tanya Olson, North Carolina, USA for “Slave to the Virgin

Lynn Roberts, Kent, UK for “Le Douanier Rousseau: Surprised

Mark Ryan, Clare, Ireland for “Breakfast with Yeats

Padraig Rooney, Muenchenstein, Switzerland for “The Names of the Winds

John Withworth, Kent, UK for “First Sight

Amber West, New York, USA for “Daughter Eraser”

Alexandra Zempiloglou, Thessaloniki, Greece for “I lost me child”

 

Commended (70)
in alphabetical order


Susan Adams, NSW Australia for “Entire of Himself”
Melanie Almeder, Virginia, USA for “The Kennebec”
Devreaux Baker, California, USA for “New Orleans Style of Prayer”
Gerry Boland, Roscommon Ireland for “The Local Accupuncturist”
Burton Bradley, Wyoming USA, for “A Very Old Man Smoking His Last Cigar”
Genevieve Burger-Weiser, New York, USA for “Small People”
Cian Cafferky, Dublin, Ireland for “Nothing to See”
Mary Rose Callan, Dublin, Ireland for “Small Girl with Orange Paint”
Karen Campbell, Cheshire UK for The Ichthyologist as a Young Man”
Ron Carey, Dublin, Ireland for “Finavarra”
Eileen Casey, Dublin, Ireland for “Brought to Surface”
Evan Costigan, Dublin, Ireland for “The Kiss”
Hilary Davies, London, UK for “Coming Back”
Maria Dilorenzo New York, USA for “The PO Box”
William Doreski, New Hampshire, USA for “Blue Cotton Dress”
Tom Dredge, Kildare, Ireland for “Teelin Fiddlers”
Roger Elkin, Biddulph Moor, UK for “Mustapha Loves Her”
Michael Farry, Meath, Ireland for “Rulers”
Rachel Feder, New Orleans, USA for “Three Birds, One Heart”
Claudia Finseth, Tacoma, WA, USA for “Small Cry”
Siobhan Flynn, Dublin, Ireland for “My inner child is a teenage boy”
Peggie Gallagher, Sligo, Ireland for “Old Lady”
Carmel Hayes, Kilkenny, Ireland for “Self Portrait”
Eoin Hegarty, Carlow, Ireland for “Secret Pools”
Tania Hershman, Bristol, UK for “Dreams of a Tea Seller”
Gail Irvine, Aberdeen, Scotland for “Daily Bread”
Helena Kahn, Cork, Ireland for “East Cork A.D. 2000”
Nora Keller, New Jersey, USA for “Affinity”
Peter Kline, San Francisco, USA for “Fear of the Weaver”
John J. Kelly, Dublin, Ireland for “Up the Moyne (for rhubarb)”
W. F. Lantry, Washington D.C. USA for “Evanescence”
Paige MacKay, Ontario, Canada for “the ropes”
Michael McCarthy, Yorkshire, UK for “Westerns”
Robert Mc Dowell, Dublin, Ireland for “Kiss Chasing”
Mourad Mchiri, Montreal, Canada for “The Song of the Libertadores”
Michael McKimm, London, UK for “Eventually I had to leave....”
Alan McMonagle, Galway, Ireland for “Witch Woman”
Jim Maguire, Wexford, Ireland for “Nocturne”
Maryvonne May , St Pons de Thomiers, France for “Limpkins and Pelicans”
Maximilian Meinhardt, Mainz, Germany for “a vulture circles – black the body sweats”
David C. Meyer, Illinois, USA for “Apologio pro Poemate Meo”
Jory Mickelson, Idaho, USA for “So Careful After”
David Mohan, Dublin, Ireland for “The Swim”
Anna Moore, Waterford, Ireland for “Peace in Rest”
Gerard Moore, Laois, Ireland for “The Island”
Mary Moore, West Virgina, USA for “Damara Diving”
Peggy Moran, Illinois, USA for “Colored”
Irene Mosvold, Kentucky, USA for “Death Takes A Stroll”
Mae Newman, Dublin, Ireland for “Peace Lily”
James O’Brien, Massachusetts, USA for “first they get distracted”
Karen O’Connor, Kerry, Ireland for “Taken”
Mary O’Gorman, Tipperary, Ireland for “Lasair Choille”
Tim O’Leary, London, UK for “Bats in Lucania”
Cathal O’Riordain, Dublin, Ireland for “The Shape of my Father’s Feet”
Michelle O’Sullivan, Mayo, Ireland for “Substance”
Susan Azar Porterfield, Illinois, USA for “Woman’s Art”
Edward Power, Waterford, Ireland for “Tintype Girl”
Aidan Rooney, Massachusetts, USA for “Circuit”
Matthew Rowe, London, United Kingdom for “Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday”
Denise Ryan, Dublin, Ireland for “Moon Brides”
Don Schofield, Thessaloniki, Greece for “The Blind”
Sally Spedding, Ammanford, Wales for “The Missing”
Kim Stafford, Oregon, USA for “Wild Light at Achill Island”
Victor Tapner, Essex, UK for “Banquet in the Hall of Happiness”
Dominic Thompson, Surrey, UK for “General Nguyan Ngoc Loan executing a Viet Cong prisoner in Saigon – E.A.”
Eran Tzelgov Beersheba, Israel for “Long Legged Cry”
Christian Wallace, Galway, Ireland for “Across the Landscape”
Julie Watts, Watermans Bay, Australia for “And Everyday Is Sunday”
Sarah Wetzel, New York, USA for “Near Death Experience”
Michael White, North Carolina, USA for “Woman Holding a Pearl Necklace”
John Hartley Williams, Berlin, Germany for “Houri”
Leigh Zaphiropoulos, New York, USA for “Coming Too, A Head, Near You”

 

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___________

 

 

 

2011 Winners

 

First Prize: Death of Alaska by Sandra Ann Winters

 

Sandra Ann Winters takes the 2011 Gregory O'Donoghue Poetry Prize

 

 

Second Prize: Superstition by Tadhg Russell

 

Third Prize: Bulloch Harbour, Winter 09 by Mike Casey

 

 

Honorary Mentions

(alphabetical order)

 

Marina Blitshteyn (New York, USA), 'Winding the Watch'

Magdalena Cullen (Cork, Ireland), 'Two Things'

Caroline M Davies (Bedfordshire, UK), 'At Sea'

Peggie Gallagher (Sligo, Ireland), 'In Her Later Years'

Noel King (Co. Kerry, Ireland), 'Danger'

Jim Maguire (Wexford, Ireland), 'Water Ghosts'

Michael McKimm (London, UK) 'The Ice Harvest'

Patrick Moran (Co. Tipperary, Ireland), 'So Much'

Tadhg Russell (Co. Cork, Ireland), 'The Wood'

KC Trommer (New York, USA), 'First Map'

 

 

 

The 2011 shortlist:

 

In alphabetical order by author:

 

Marina Blitshteyn (New York, USA), 'Winding the Watch'

Mike Casey (Co. Dublin, Ireland), 'Bulloch Harbour, Winter 09'

Magdalena Cullen (Cork, Ireland), 'Two Things'

Caroline M Davies (Bedfordshire, UK), 'At Sea'

Peggie Gallagher (Sligo, Ireland), 'In Her Later Years'

Noel King (Co. Kerry, Ireland), 'Danger'

Jim Maguire (Wexford, Ireland), 'Water Ghosts'

Michael McKimm (London, UK) 'The Ice Harvest'

Patrick Moran (Co. Tipperary, Ireland), 'So Much'

Tadhg Russell (Co. Cork, Ireland), 'Superstition'

Tadhg Russell (Co. Cork, Ireland), 'The Wood'

KC Trommer (New York, USA), 'First Map'

Sandra Ann Winters (North Carolina, USA), 'Death of Alaska'

 

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2010 Winners

 

First Prize: John F. Deane

'Shoemaker'

John F Deane

 

 

Second Prize: Siobhan Campbell

'Clew Bay from the Reek'

 

Siobhan Campbell

 

Third Prize: Patrick Deeley

'Geezer'

Patrick Deeley

 

Commended Poets

 

Listed alphabetically:

Lauren K. Alleyne– New York, USA

Maureen Gallagher– Galway, Ireland

John Gerard– Cork, Ireland

Catherine Phil MacCarthy– Dublin, Ireland

Patrick Maddock– New Ross, Ireland

Pete Mullineaux– Galway, Ireland

Cristina Newton– Swindon, UK

Mary Anne Perkins– Richmond, UK

Jane Robinson– Enniskerry, Ireland

Cherry Smyth– London, UK

 

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Words Ireland

The Munster Literature Centre
is a constituent member
of Words Ireland.

 

 

 

Fool for Poetry
Chapbook
Competition

Workshops

Now open.
Deadline
31 May 2016

 

 

 

Writing Workshops
at the MLC

Danielle McLaughlin

Evening fiction
workshops
coming soon.

 

 

Southword Editions

Tania Hershman

Newest books:

Fool For Poetry
chapbooks by
Tania Hershman
& Victor Tapner

 

 

Southword Issue 29

Southword Journal

New issue, free to read online.

 

 

Poetry International

Recent additions:

Kimberly Campanello
,
Justin Quinn,
Brendan Cleary,
Eleanor Hooker
& more

poetryinternationalweb.net

 

 

 

The Cork International
Short Story Festival

Cork International Short Story Festival

Annually in
autumn.

 

 

Frank O'Connor
Short Story Award

2015 Laureate:
Carys Davies

Carys Davies

World's richest prize for
a short story collection,
co-sponsored by the
UCC School of English
and
Cork City Council
.

Seán Ó Faoláin
Short Story
Competition

Sean O'Faolain Short Story Competition

Opens
May 2016

Cork International
Poetry Festival

Cork International Short Story Festival

Annually in spring.

 

 

 

O'Donoghue Poetry
Competition

Sean O'Faolain Short Story Competition

2015 winners
announced!

 

 
 
©2009
The Munster Literature Centre
   

Frank O'Connor House, 84 Douglas Street, Cork, Ireland.

Tel. (353) 021 4312955 Email munsterlit@eircom.net

   
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